Hill Bounding With Colin Rogers

Hill bounding, particularly with poles, is one of the most effective whole-body exercises a competitive cross country ski racer can do to prepare for the season. The combination of the body motions that are very similar to that of skiing on snow and the power development required for moving efficiently uphill is hard to beat for off-season ski training.

Although hill bounding can be used for many types of workouts, it is best utilized for higher intensity work such as lactate threshold and VO2 max sessions. By concentrating on bounding form you will ensure that you get the most out of this type of workout.

In the video, Colin demonstrates on the same hill that we use extensively for our training. In addition to using the grassy hillsides shown in the video, we also include longer (20-minute) aerobic and shorter VO2 max workouts up the steep cat tracks to the top of the mountain. We are fortunate to now have this hill (and mountain) right in our back yard. By contrast, when I was on US Cross Country Ski Team, I lived in Cleveland Ohio — not the most noted places for cross country skiing. However, even in Ohio there were some local alpine ski hills that were perfect for these types of workouts. I remember fondly going up and down the hills at “Alpine Valley” in the eastern suburbs of Cleveland. So even if you are not in the mountains, look for a local hill, preferably mowed, and have at it!

The whole-body, cross country skiing-like motions are central to getting the most out of hill bounding. Cardio, strength, and technique come together in these sessions and they should be a regular part of your training plan.

– Betsy Youngman

Betsy Youngman is a two-time US Cross Country Ski Olympian (1988, 1992), US National Champion, 1989 Birkie champion, and US Ski Team member from 1987 – 1992. She is now, a devoted master’s skier, coach, Betsy is a 7-time Birkie competitor. Four of her races were top-10 finishes, including one at age 55 in 2015. Outside of the ski season she pursues her other passion- whitewater kayaking throughout the Western US.

Pocket Guide to Cross-Country Ski Training

1. Intensity
No matter how little time you are able to devote to training, you should always fit in one intensity workout every week to ten days starting in the summer. Maintaining that ability and feel of going hard throughout the year is important since it can be very difficult to regain once you have lost it. This is especially true the older you get.

2. Over-Distance
It is amazing how well an occasional OD can maintain your endurance. If you average 45 minutes per workout, try to fit in an easy 2 hour over-distance day. If you average 1 to 1.5 hours, try to fit in a nice 3-hour outing.

3. “Everyday” Workouts
For some of you, doing intervals may be unappealing and you really don’t have time for OD workouts either, so training only consists of “everyday” workouts. These are simple workouts where you just head out and run or bike or whatever at a comfortable pace for the time available to you. If you are only able to train for 30 minutes three times per week, make sure that you are getting something out of them.

Read Full Guide: www.skipost.com/training

Source: SkiPost.com

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How to Peak for Racing for Beginners

by Karmen M. Whitham, CXC Skiing

My suggestion for any relatively new cross-country ski racer is to build the endurance foundation first, with A LOT of true level 1 volume. The time to do this is in the spring and summer and then come back to it for a short period after the fall intensity block. This allows you to put in major hours on snow and absorb the work you’ve just put in from your intensity training. Paying attention to the aerobic foundation is paramount at the beginning of your skiing career because it builds a foundation of fitness that acts as a spring board for anaerobic training. It’s the difference between building a house with a cement basement “foundation” vs. just sticking some plywood and drywall into the dirt. You’ve got to have something to keep you strong and stable.

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There is a caveat of losing speed however. Therefore, it is advised that you add simple speeds (fartlek) to your distance workouts. For junior athletes I like to surprise them with 15-30 second sprints during distance or over-distance workouts. I like this method because it also creates playful competition which reminds us why we love to mess around on skis in the first place. Alternatively, you can strategically plan sprints into distance workouts, for example, add 5×30 second speeds (take a minute between each to get the heart rate back to level 1) in the middle of a 2- hour ski or run.

If you keep distance workouts (with speeds) as the foundation of your training (4-6x a week) and add level 3 and level 4 workouts 2-3 times a week, you should not jeopardize your endurance capacity. In training blocks where level 3 and 4 are the primary focus, make sure you are still doing one over-distance workout per week. These workouts are designed to be at true level 1 in order to build mitochondria for oxygen transportation thus maintaining your aerobic fitness.

As for sprint workouts that are effective, I’m a big fan of “mock-sprint days” where you have a qualifier, and three more sprints after that with about 5-minutes of active recovery between them. Not only does this help build anaerobic fitness it also sets an environment for mental preparedness that will get the athlete ready for sprint competitions. Otherwise 1-km relays, time-based ladders, and distance based ladders are other ways to construct sprint, level 4 and level 3 intervals to promote anaerobic capabilities.

To train to be a cross-country skier means you are creating fitness in every aspect of human performance. You should think of training as an interplay between strengthening the aerobic and anaerobic systems as opposed to training either exclusively. That said, you may shift your attention to simply emphasize one system over the other, to coincide with the goal of your respective training period.

Use Your Poles in Summer

Q: I feel I am too old and fragile to rollerski. What should I do instead?

A: We suggest you hike and run with your ski poles and use them to push off with as you would when skiing. You can use the poles you ski on snow with, but it is better to use poles that are shorter than your on-snow poles. The exact height will be determined by the energy you can put into the effort. When classic skiing on-snow you would use a pole about 83% of your height. If you are just Nordic walking than you would use a pole around 70% of your height. So your exact dry-land pole length will be determined between 83% and 70% of your height by how dynamic your striding, bounding and poling is.

Source: Andy at SkiPost

Use Your Poles in Summer

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Building Stamina for Climbing Hills

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Q: Do you have any advice that would be specific to building stamina for climbing hills when ski season returns?

A: Consistent training throughout the year is your best way at improving your stamina and general fitness for the ski season. You’ll see the biggest changes in your fitness if you get onto a regular schedule with your training. With that consistency in training, doing specific target exercise can help with the areas you are trying to improve on. With you looking for improvement in your climbing, there are a few things I would suggest.

1. L3 hill bounding, ski walking, and moosehoofs (sub-maximal bound). Most ski specific training method you can do. Longer Level 3 repetitions are the best way to improve your climbing skills during the off season.

2. Endurance Strength: In the weight room adding in higher rep (15-20) exercises is a good way to work on endurance strength for ski specific muscle groups.

3. Rollerski Strength: Even though rollerski strength (double pole and single stick only on hills) works solely the upper body, those muscles play a large part in all ski techniques. That is why it is important to work on building a strong upper body. It helps us not to rely on our lower body as much and helps with having balanced technique.

4. Plyometrics/Spenst: Various single and double leg jumps can help us build explosion and fast twitch fibers in our muscles. A lot of times we become bogged down on hills when we are unable to transfer weight quickly from side to side.

Additional Resources:

An Outline of Nordic Training Modes
Ski Walk and Moose Hoof Combo

Videos:

–  Ski-Walking and Hill Bounding
–  Ski Walking Intervals – Workout Ideas

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Resuming Training

You have to resume your training from the beginning of May.

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Caution: take your health and wellness seriously; if you feel like you’re not physically ready to do something, it’s okay to reduce training time from 2 hours to 1.5, or from 1.5 to 1 and so on…

Change your training volume according to your capabilities and limits.

For “Intermediate” training level volume, plan to spend 5-7 hours per week on various activities in May and June. Select lightly rugged terrains for your crosses, trying to run as evenly as possible when running uphill and avoiding acceleration. Use your bicycle mostly across the plain terrain. On Sunday, perform a continuous cross with poles. It looks like a usual cross running, but during any uphill running you have to make alternating two-step moves, helping yourself with poles. Try to choose totally different areas for your training, changing them as often as possible and making short hikes through undiscovered areas every day, which will bring you a lot of fun and pleasure. Total distance is not important, just be sure to exercise for planned 1,5-2 hours.

Basics of Cross-Country Skiing – From Speed to Endurance

The classic training scheme involves the development of endurance first and then gradually increasing the speed of an athlete.

At the initial stage of training, it is important to pave the way without striving for a high tempo. Long duration exercise at a low speed, is what is really needed in the beginning. The overall endurance of an athlete develops solely on low speed training sessions when the heart rate is 120-130 beats per minute. “SLOW” means to run 10 km in about 1 hour on easier terrain. It is important for athletes to check their pulse, by using a simple heart rate monitor, or even by putting a hand on the heart or wrist.

The training modes that can be used in the first stage of training preparation are (for four months: May, June, July, August): running at a steady pace, jogging with stepping imitation, and cycling. After having developed a sufficient level of endurance over the summer months, in the fall athletes can proceed to high-speed training workouts.

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– by Eugene Goryachev, SkiSport.ru